Customer Feedback Powers Quality Assurance

Matt Morris, Matt Morris

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Customer Feedback Powers Quality Assurance
By: Marc E. Carlson, RRP
CustomerCount© Business Relationship Manager

If you want to find areas within your business model that need attention, you only have to look as far as the incoming feedback from consumers. And why not? The information is new and fresh on the minds of your consumers. If you review the overall results and do a bit of digging, you will uncover an area of your operations that is lagging in performance. Not in your eyes, but in the eyes of the consumer. Perception is a funny thing. When you are so close to the daily operations you can sometimes lose sight of who pays for all the overhead….the customer.

We all want to provide the best customer experience as feasibly possible. If we take our eye off the consumer intelligence coming in from our customer feedback program, we can jeopardize the market share we worked so hard to obtain. There will always be areas for improvement no matter what department, division or team you work in. By monitoring customer feedback on a regular basis, you should be able to identify quality assurance issues and address them before those issues become a problem. Do you think that increases the ROI on your customer feedback program? I think so.


The Future Of Mentorship In An Age Of Entrepreneur

Matt Morris, Matt Morris

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Blocking and Tackling on Mentoring. Very worth the read!
Robert A. Kobek, RRP, President
CustomerCount

The Future Of Mentorship In An Age Of Entrepreneur

Once upon a time, mentors and coaches were assigned to employees. Workers were given a very clear road map to follow, and the definitions of success were clear (even if some of them were crazy).

This kind of defined structure scarcely exists anymore, for a few reasons. Employee tenure has consistently become shorter, which makes getting advice or help from one’s company less practical than ever. In addition, middle management has been slashed, and there are fewer folks with enough bandwidth to help. Competition is fierce, and in some cases, people worry about training their own replacement, someone the company may view as newer and less expensive. With people concerned about making themselves redundant, there’s no longer an opportunity to receive years of coaching from one boss. This shift away from internal coaching is only going to be exacerbated by further shrinkages in employee tenure, and location will matter less as more people work remotely and become more entrepreneurial (either starting their own companies or becoming freelancers). Also, mentoring seldom exists at under-resourced, fast-paced startups.

Please read the rest of the article “HERE”:http://www.fastcompany.com/3003872/future-mentorship-age-entrepreneurs


Increase Your VOC ROI by EFM: Making Sense of the Alphabet

Matt Morris, Matt Morris

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Increase Your VOC ROI by EFM: Making Sense of the Alphabet
By: Marc E. Carlson, RRP
CustomerCount© Business Relationship Manager

Estimating what your organization’s ROI is on the VoC program can be a difficult number to calculate. There are a lot of variables that factor into the equation. Survey delivery rates, response rates, timeliness of receiving the feedback, impact on metrics gauging customer satisfaction or loyalty and the process for communicating results within your Enterprise Feedback Management (EFM) system. It is the latter that has the greatest impact on the overall ROI of your VoC program.

In order to improve your VoC ROI, it is imperative that all business units in your organization have knowledge of the information being produced by your VoC program and that data should be shared via your EFM system. How else are key decision-makers going to know what works and what needs to be addressed if they aren’t kept in the loop? Far too often, results from a VoC program are shared only in silos that have the most contact with customers. In order for the ROI on your VoC program to improve, data sharing requirements need to be widened so you can better leverage the customer data your organization is continuously collecting. Try pushing the VOC results via your EFM system and I bet it makes a positive difference on your ROI.


Finding a Needle in a Haystack

Matt Morris, Matt Morris

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Finding a Needle in a Haystack
By: Marc E. Carlson, RRP
CustomerCount© Business Relationship Manager

Organizations who have developed a customer feedback program compile a great deal of information on a continuous basis to glean one piece of insight here and there. If addressed this information will improve overall business performance. Due to the vast amount of continuous data coming in, how does one begin to look for that needle in a haystack that will make a positive impact on their bottom line? The answer is data segmentation. Data segmentation, if done correctly, allows the opportunity to identify what customers think is working well in transacting business with your organization and also areas for improvement. This exercise can be time consuming as you scan a plethora of data, however your customer feedback provider should be able to assist with their data segmentation capabilities. Make sure you communicate with your vendor on what your data segmentation desires are before you export that data out of the vendor’s system to conduct additional analytics.

Data segmentation also allows an organization to better classify the type of customers they have. Is the customer a satisfied or loyal customer? Depending on your definition of a satisfied versus loyal customer, your marketing and sales divisions can adapt their messages and processes accordingly to fit the right group of customer. Does a particular group of customers like to receive marketing messages via e-mail over direct mail? By segmenting data on customer communication preferences, you can deliver the right message in the format desired by your customer. Hence, increasing the likelihood a customer will come back to your organization for future purchases. There may even be some cost savings found as your organization may be using direct mail extensively when the majority of customers are technologically savvy and prefer communications by e-mail.

There are a lot of ways you can slice and dice data. Make sure you have a goal in mind before you delve into data segmentation because what you don’t want to do is spin your wheels looking at all sorts of segmentation that will not have a positive impact on your business. Be precise in your objective, and I bet you uncover the needle in the haystack.


Dare to Compete

Matt Morris, Matt Morris

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Dare to Compete
By: Robert A. Kobek, RRP, President
CustomerCount

“The successful man is the one who finds out what is the matter with his business before his competitors do”. Roy L. Smith

It should not be a surprise to anyone that I find out what is wrong with our competitors’ products, sometimes before they do. I am talking to their customers every day. Some are very happy, some are don’t care, some are really mad. And, if I don’t talk to their customers, I follow their Facebook and Twitter accounts and I have friends engaged in LinkedIn. Even my Gmail account searches for posts of those that dare to compete with me. Oh the information we glean from all of this is enough to curl your hair!

Bringing us now to the year 2012 and the question “why in the world would you not find out what is up with your customers before your competitors do”? The technology is there (here, actually), the data is easily collected, and it is proven, time after time after time, that customers will tell you; by phone, via email, fax, social networking and word of mouth.

Bad news travels really fast; with today’s technology that’s the speed allowed by fiber, light speed. (Light travels at a constant, finite speed of 186,000 mi/sec. A traveler, moving at the speed of light, would circum-navigate the equator approximately 7.5 times in one second). Good news travels at a snail’s pace. Nothing good comes from bad news and good news is too late to get to you to do anything about.

So the question is you doing so much business that your business is too good to find ways to capture customer feedback?