I Won't Hire People Who Use Poor Grammar. Here's Why.

Matt Morris, Matt Morris

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Being that I am also a stickler on business etiquette, including proper use of grammar, written and verbal, this article really spells it out.

I Won’t Hire People Who Use Poor Grammar. Here’s Why.
by: Kyle Wiens
If you think an apostrophe was one of the 12 disciples of Jesus, you will never work for me. If you think a semicolon is a regular colon with an identity crisis, I will not hire you. If you scatter commas into a sentence with all the discrimination of a shotgun, you might make it to the foyer before we politely escort you from the building.

Some might call my approach to grammar extreme, but I prefer Lynne Truss’s more cuddly phraseology: I am a grammar “stickler.” And, like Truss — author of Eats, Shoots & Leaves — I have a “zero tolerance approach” to grammar mistakes that make people look stupid.

“Click Here”:http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/07/i_wont_hire_people_who_use_poo.html to read the rest of the article.

~Bob Kobek


Why Are Companies Flocking to NPS

Matt Morris, Matt Morris

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Why Are Companies Flocking to NPS
by: Matthew R. Morris
ISOM Manager, CustomerCount©

I was talking the other day with one of my colleagues about the NPS rating system and how we are seeing companies flock to it like seagulls flock to fresh bread on the beach. At one point in the discussion I wondered if it should be the end all question that companies base their decisions on.

There is no doubt in my mind that the NPS question is very valuable when measuring customer feedback for a company. Whether a person would recommend a company to their friends and family goes a great deal toward customer loyalty and satisfaction. However, I do not believe that it should be the one “magic bullet” for an Enterprise Customer Feedback program. Many of the times a person who receives a survey has had minimal interaction with the company in question. How can they be prepared to make a recommendation about a company that they know very little about? I know that I have to have had many interactions and feel confident about a recommendation before I would even mention it to my friends and family. What are your thoughts on this matter?


NPS – Is It Really the One Number You Need To Know

Matt Morris, Matt Morris

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NPS – Is It Really the One Number You Need To Know

With all the chatter about NPS today, this article really spells it out. When “CustomerCount”:http://www.customercount.com provides our system to our clients, we are careful to make certain they have clearly identified and actionable results.

“Click Here”:http://blog.workingsolutions.com/nps-is-it-really-the-one-number-you-need-to-know/?goback=%2Egde_101406_member_133615170 to read the article.

~Bob Kobek


Being in the Know

Matt Morris, Matt Morris

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Being in the Know
By: Marc E. Carlson, RRP
CustomerCount© Business Relationship Manager

When a customer has a bad experience with your organization, and they tell you so by completing a survey, they typically tell others during the course of the day. This information travels fast and can be damaging to your brand because many people will form an opinion of your organization based on that one individual’s recent experience. In this day in age where competition is fierce, wouldn’t you want to know of a problem as soon as possible?

At CustomerCount©, we send email alerts to key stakeholders when a survey response comes in that falls below a predetermined threshold of acceptability. We have found this feature to be of interest to our clients because it allows them to be proactive in making things right with the customer.

Email alerts are an efficient manner to push critical customer information to those that can address and own this situation. You can send alerts to one or many employees in your organization depending on your corporate structure. Within the alert, you have the customer’s name, contact information, and their completed survey so whoever contacts the customer can be informed about their last interaction with your organization. Having all that information in a concise format allows an organization to efficiently and swiftly address the situation with the goal of having that customer come back again.


Even a 10 Point Scale May Not be Enough: Obtain Granular Survey Data by Using Multiple Question Types

Matt Morris, Matt Morris

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Even a 10 Point Scale May Not be Enough: Obtain Granular Survey Data by Using Multiple Question Types
By: Marc E. Carlson, RRP
CustomerCount© Business Relationship Manager

At CustomerCount©, we rarely have a client using just one type of question because we want our clients to conduct a deep-dive into what will make that customer buy more product and encourage their friends and family to do the same.

Collecting customer feedback to gauge satisfaction is generally accomplished by asking the consumer a question and having them rate their experience using a five, seven, or even ten point scale. The answers to these types of questions are valuable to an organization as it provides a good overview but does not get to the root of why the consumer had a favorable experience in transacting business or not. In order to better understand the overall experience a consumer has with your brand, you need to incorporate multiple question types.

For example, use a rank order question so you can understand what that consumer views most important to them when doing business with your organization. I would even suggest incorporating a verbatim question afterwards to hear firsthand from the consumer why they thought one answer versus another is more important to them. In doing so, an organization can better understand customer purchasing preferences and perhaps the type of customer experience they desire in web chat, e-mail or dealing with a call center representative.

Having a variety of question types gives the appearance of a well thought out survey. Just ask yourself, how many times have I received a survey where all the questions are the same? I bet more times than not you receive a survey with just a scaled answer distribution. Pretty boring….So next time you put together a survey to obtain customer feedback, throw in a couple of different types of questions. I think you will be pleasantly surprised by the feedback you receive.